0

Thousands of angry Market Basket workers have elevated ousted Market CEO Arthur T. Demoulas as close to god-hood as a man can get. More than 5,000 employees turned out to proclaim their loyalty to their former CEO at a Tewksbury rally Monday, double the size of a protest last week.

Continue Reading
0

Why paddle around with the little fish when you can swim with the big ones?

Continue Reading
0

In Washington, when it comes to knock-down, drag-out fights over environmental costs and energy demands, the Keystone XL Pipeline controversy has sucked most of the air out of the proverbial room.

Continue Reading
0

PARCC isn't standing still. Heading into the second year of field testing in the spring of 2015, about 60 percent of Massachusetts school districts have opted to jettison MCAS for PARCC, the new online student assessment regime; roughly 40 percent of districts have decided to stay with MCAS.

Continue Reading
0

Boston Globe columnist Kevin Cullen recently visited "Vegas-by-the-Sea" and found nothing good to say about Atlantic City's casino experiment. In the time-honored tradition of journalists everywhere, Cullen tapped the consummate local expert, a taxi driver, for his view on the Bay State's gaming proposition. "You say Massachusetts is gonna have casinos?" the cabbie said. "You people are nuts."

Continue Reading
0

Gov. Deval Patrick puts his John Hancock to the legislation, Massachusetts will have the highest state minimum wage in the country. By 2017, minimum wage workers can look forward to earning $11 an hour. Ten other states have raised their minimum wages above the current federal minimum of $7.25 an hour. Continue Reading
0

Boston 2024 is going full tilt at its dream of securing the 2024 Olympics. Washington DC, Los Angeles, and San Francisco are also in the running. Los Angeles has hosted the Olympics twice before; San Francisco has tried and failed twice before; and Washington is, well, a beautiful world class city with an awesome Metro.

Continue Reading
0

Massachusetts lawmakers probably thought they had dispensed with national embarrassment when they criminalized upskirting in record time. They forgot about the state’s bizarre liquor licensing laws, which require cities and towns to petition the Legislature for additional liquor licenses if a community has reached its population-based quota on licenses for restaurant and bars.

Continue Reading
0

If the Obama administration has its way, a prospect far from assured, states soon will be able to toll interstate highways. A US Department of Transportation proposal, embedded in the $302 billion federal surface transportation reauthorization bill, would allow state officials to establish tolls on roads such as Interstate 93 in order to raise revenue for infrastructure repairs.

Continue Reading
0

Boston magazine's David Bernstein did journalism a favor this week. The web was aflame over a Massachusetts bill that purported to forbid a person seeking a divorce from having sex in his or her home.

Continue Reading
1

Jawbones rattled to the floor across the Commonwealth last week when state lawmakers likely set a legislative speed record with a new law that criminalized upskirting.

Continue Reading
1

Gov. Deval Patrick has a serious problem on his hands. Some state agencies are in full grip of the Peter Principle.

Continue Reading
0

As the demands for Department of Children and Families Commissioner Olga Roche to step down grow louder, so do the voices of support. But the fate of DCF does not lie in whether this commissioner stays or goes, but in the Child Welfare League of America's report on the agency due later this spring.

Continue Reading
0

With the Sochi Olympics as a backdrop, the Legislature’s Olympics special commission ponders whether the state’s capital city is up to the challenge of hosting the world’s premier sporting event in 2024.

Continue Reading
0

What do Massachusetts and Alabama have in common? They both are lousy at using the best tools available to craft state budgets. That news may come as a shock to Bay State policymakers who like to trot out the "We're Number 1" banner at every opportunity.

Continue Reading
0

Gov. Deval Patrick pronounced the state of the Commonwealth “strong,” but the state of the Department of Children and Families is anything but. Patrick won’t be able to revel in the afterglow of his final address for long: The political fallout of from the disappearance of Jeremiah Oliver has only just begun.

Continue Reading
0

Despite comfortable perches on Beacon Hill, state lawmakers are fleeing the Legislature at a fast clip. Leading the outmigration are several top lieutenants to House Speaker Robert DeLeo.

Continue Reading
0

Forty years ago this June, US District Court Judge W. Arthur Garrity Jr. ordered Boston to begin busing white and black students to integrate in its racially divided school district. The court order unleashed one of the most ferocious episodes of urban unrest in the country’s history, a period that continues to blemish Boston’s reputation today.

Continue Reading
0

Should anyone cry a river for the Massachusetts Bay Commuter Railroad? The long-time operator of the MBTA's commuter rail network has objected to the process that appears to have put Keolis, a French company, on track to snatch away a nearly $3 billion dollar deal to run the extensive system.

Continue Reading
0

Conservatives may be cheering on former Massachusetts senator Scott Brown’s likely New Hampshire US Senate run next year. But the inevitability of Brown is getting a little old for our New Hampshire brethren.  The

Continue Reading
1

Despite Frank Addivinola’s early evening robocalls proclaiming a path to victory through low turnout, an upset was not on the agenda in Tuesday’s Fifth Congressional District special election . Katherine Clark soundly trounced the Boston Republican 66 percent to 32 percent. Two independent candidates pulled in the remaining percentage points

Continue Reading
0

Charlie Baker 2.0 has learned two important lessons from Charlie Baker 1.0. First, he had to lighten up. Second, he needed to appeal to women voters who were turned off by his angry persona. The Republican gubernatorial candidate has worked to fix the first issue by stressing his father-husband-Red Sox fan bona-fides and sporting broad smiles and purple ties.

Continue Reading
0


There are a few speed bumps on the way to Hillary Clinton’s long march to a possible 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, and one of them is the senior senator from Massachusetts, Elizabeth Warren.

Continue Reading
0


Mr. Personality

Continue Reading
0


For years, Cape Cod officials wanted to use rail to get tourists off their clogged roads and onto beaches and into restaurants and shops. Coordinated by the Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority, pilot weekend service to the Cape was launched this year in time for Memorial Day by flexing federal dollars to upgrade the freight tracks used to haul trash off Cape. Partnering with the MBTA, the pilot effort persuaded more than 16,500 passengers that the service was worth sampling.

Continue Reading
0


The week before Halloween, Gov. Deval Patrick is giving out transportation projects like candy: New Red and Orange line cars to calm those anxious commuters in Greater Boston who despair of seeing an end to the horror show that is commuting on the MBTA; electronic tolling that will prod drivers who haven’t gotten a transponder to get with the program; and straighter roads at the Allston tolls on the Mass Turnpike.

Continue Reading
0


State Sen. Katherine Clark’s victory in the crowded Democratic primary field almost assuredly fast tracks her to Washington, DC, just in time to cope with the fallout from the creep of the planet’s most powerful economy toward economic Armageddon.

Continue Reading
0


Most Massachusetts officeholders don’t want to be seen anywhere near Lawrence City Hall these days if they don’t have to be there. Members of Congress tend to stay way far away from mayoral races, especially if it’s a dicey one like the November contest between incumbent William Lantigua and his challenger, Dan Rivera.

Continue Reading
0


Another front line has opened up in the battle over an East Boston casino: Multifaith coalitions.

Continue Reading
1


What’s old is new again in Boston. John Connolly and Marty Walsh, two middle-aged white men of Irish descent, will go into the general election to succeed to Mayor Tom Menino. A New York Times headline says it all: “Tradition Trumps Diversity in Boston Mayoral Vote.”

Continue Reading
0


Lawrence Mayor William Lantigua’s victory in the city’s preliminary contest shocked exactly no one in the Merrimack Valley. While Boston has had an issue-focused mayoral primary campaign and other races across the state wrapped up with few fireworks, Lawrence has been consumed by one thing only: Lantigua’s unstoppable march to the November general election.

Continue Reading
0


Never underestimate the threat of traffic nightmares to doom an $800 million economic development project. West Springfield voters said no in a Big E way to Hard Rock International’s plan to open a casino on the site of the Eastern States Exposition – rejecting the plan 55 percent to 45 percent.

Continue Reading
0


What if Massachusetts levied a tax and no one wanted to pay it?  The business community is in full chuck-the-tea-in-Boston-Harbor mode over the new computer and software services tax.  

Continue Reading
0


After years of heated battles with Vermont environmentalists and lawmakers, Entergy, the New Orleans-based power plant operator, announced the closing of its Vermont Yankee nuclear facility.

Continue Reading
0


MassDOT must be the least popular agency in Western Massachusetts, thanks to the touchy subject of tolls on the Massachusetts Turnpike. Last week, state transportation officials announced the reinstitution of tolls on the western section of the Turnpike, a decision residents roundly criticized. That move probably would have been easier to swallow, since Turnpike tolls were scheduled to come down anyway once the highway’s bonds were paid off in 2017. However, state lawmakers may find some way to keep them up.

Continue Reading
0


Tewksbury gave the percolating casino gambling repeal movement some momentum this week. In what had become a raucous debate in the Merrimack Valley town, one featuring bar fights and disappearing lawn signs, anti-gaming forces prevailed at a special town meeting Tuesday night.

Continue Reading
0


Western Massachusetts is in an uproar over the planned reintroduction of tolls on Exits 1 through 6 of the Massachusetts Turnpike on October 15.

Continue Reading
0


Another year, another transportation finance debacle in progress. Legislators balked at Gov. Deval Patrick’s tax-laden $1.1 billion proposal and crafted one that injects a few million less dollars into the network. True to his word, Patrick vetoed the Legislature’s plan. Lawmakers are poised Wednesday to overturn his veto unless House Speaker Robert DeLeo is kidnapped by aliens or senators engage in a wholesale revolt against Senate President Therese Murray.

Continue Reading
0


History did not repeat itself. With visions of dollars to city coffers dancing in their heads, Springfield voters weren’t about to chuck away MGM International’s $800 million casino opportunity.The MGM agreement got Springfielders’ seal of approval in Tuesday’s referendum campaign, 58 percent to 42 percent.  

Continue Reading
0


On a hot and sunny Sunday after the Fourth of July, hundreds of people decided to leave the Cape “early” to get a jump on getting ready for the work week ahead. They learned the hard way when the traffic jam leaving the Cape over the Sagamore Bridge stretched for a gruesome 25 miles. One woman told The Boston Globe that it took her six hours to get from Provincetown to Boston, a trip that normally takes roughly half that time. Monday was only a bit better.

Continue Reading
0


If casino developers don’t “wow” the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, they might as well pack up and go home.

Continue Reading
0


President Barack Obama needs Gov. Deval Patrick more than ever. Republicans are gleefully salivating over not one, not two, but three administration scandals, and Attorney General Eric Holder is front and center of what may be the most serious of them.

Continue Reading
0


Led by the Globe, the Boston news media covered itself in journalism glory in the early days after the marathon bombing with exhaustive 24/7 coverage of the Boylston Street carnage and metro area manhunt.

Continue Reading
0


In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings last week, more than half of young people in Boston aged 18-29 used social media as their news conduit of choice. Daily developments sometimes produced a cascade of tweets that spread misinformation until officialdom set matters straight and counseled everyone to get a grip.



Continue Reading
0


A survey of any major domestic tragedy of the past 25 years will turn up numerous examples of stellar news reportage. But combine the 24/7 news cycle with an industry culture often predicated on scooping the competition, and the news media is bound to get things flat out wrong, especially during a crisis when that self-imposed pressure to publish first ramps up.

Continue Reading
0


Transportation budget shortfalls have dominated the debate on Beacon Hill in recent weeks. When lawmakers’ attention does swivel around to education, the public conversations tend to center on a lack of state investment or charter schools.

Continue Reading
0


If the Massachusetts Senate race shapes up as the first US election where the environment is a decisive factor, Stephen Lynch could be in for a very rough ride.

Continue Reading
0


The sequester is finally upon us. A sense of doom may be gripping Washington, but by the time one gets to Boston, the reaction is mostly “meh.”  Even though Massachusetts will take a big hit, average Joes and Janes are either indifferent or unaware of the automatic $85 billion in federal budget cuts that are scheduled to take effect on March 1.

Continue Reading
1


Scott Brown’s sabbatical from electoral politics shows that he still has much to learn if he aspires to sit in the Corner Office.

Continue Reading
0


Every winter, the Blizzard of 1978 gets trotted out as the yardstick against which all other winter storms are measured. On the occasion of the 35th anniversary of the monster event, there are photo galleries to click through, the Duke’s sweater to trot out, and personal recollections to unpack.

Continue Reading
0


When a young person once complained about taxes to Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, the Bostonian replied, “I like to pay taxes. With them I buy civilization.”

Continue Reading
0


Younger members of the Kennedy political dynasty have emerged as high-profile opponents of medical marijuana and across-the-board legalization of the drug.

Continue Reading
0


With Gov. Deval Patrick gone AWOL more and more, Lt. Gov. Tim Murray has been tapped to lead the fight to forestall cutbacks at Bay State military facilities. So far, the Pentagon is winning.

Continue Reading
1

By Gabrielle Gurley

Massachusetts does not have the financial wherewithal to fully address the looming fiscal problems facing cities and towns.

Continue Reading
0

By Gabrielle Gurley

About two years ago, a Hollywood movie production company sought permission from North Andover Town Manager Mark Rees to film at a private home in a residential neighborhood. It was the first request that the town had gotten in a long time.

Continue Reading
0

By Gabrielle Gurley

The financially hobbled MBTA continues to come up with creative ways to reel in cash.

Continue Reading
0

Gabrielle Gurley

Wind siting reform legislation continues to go nowhere fast. 

Continue Reading
0
By Gabrielle Gurley

US Sen. Scott Brown continues to gain national prominence as Washington’s new go-to guy. All it takes these days is a letter from Brown to signal the way the legislative winds are blowing on Capitol Hill. So says Washington Post reporter Perry Bacon Jr in a Friday profile of the freshman senator’s ballooning influence on inside the Beltway politics and policy. Continue Reading
0
By Gabrielle Gurley

Not exactly. Anti-tax activists won’t get any ammunition from the US Census Bureau for their tax rollback efforts.  The bureau’s annual study of State and Local Government Finances for fiscal year 2008 found that the amount of state and local taxes turned over to Massachusetts as a share of total personal income was 10.3 percent in FY 2008.  Thirty other states had more to complain about: crunching those numbers, the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center concluded that the Bay State ranks 31st in country in taxes.  Looking at those figures another way, the state placed in the bottom 40 percent of all 50 states for taxes as a share of state personal income two years ago. Continue Reading
0

By Gabrielle Gurley

Unless more immediate steps are taken to rein in accelerating health care and pension costs, municipal officials will continue to triage community services to pay for employee benefits, local municipal leaders and policymakers warned a Boston Foundation forum audience Wednesday.

Continue Reading
0
By Gabrielle Gurley

This week, Boston University and The Pew Research's Center Project for Excellence in Journalism published Hidden In Plain Sight, From Kennedy to Brown. The report dissects national and local newspaper coverage of US Sen. Scott Brown's path to victory over Attorney General Martha Coakley.

Continue Reading
0
By Gabrielle Gurley

Worcester has its share of municipal headaches, but by this summer city officials will have one less: Worcester Regional Airport.

Continue Reading
0

By Gabrielle Gurley

How long will the charade of trying to schedule the Massachusetts Transportation Department’s board of directors to appear before the Joint Transportation Committee continue?

Continue Reading
0

By Gabrielle Gurley

With all eyes on the big dogs in the governor’s race, the underdog can afford to go out on a limb.

Continue Reading
0

By Gabrielle Gurley

Rep. William Lantigua thinks so. Elected mayor of Lawrence last fall, the Democrat is hanging on to his House seat for dear life. And no one — not Gov. Deval Patrick nor any of his Beacon Hill colleagues — has yet been able to convince Latingua otherwise, even with his city’s finances collapsing all around him.

Continue Reading
0

By Gabrielle Gurley

Bay State transportation officials continue to throw everything they’ve got into South Coast Rail , but the feds took a pass, deciding that three western New England intercity rail projects were more worthy.

Connecticut landed $40 million to build a second set of tracks between New Haven, Hartford and through to Springfield . Along with speeding up Amtrak’s Vermonter route, that fistful of dollars helps advance a commuter rail project overshadowed by state officials’ preoccupation with the New Bedford-Fall River-Boston line. Springfield area commuter rail advocates have long argued that dialing up service way out west, especially through the “ Knowledge Corridor ,” would be just as vital and cost much less, tens of millions versus more than a billion for South Coast Rail.

Massachusetts did reel in $70 million for stations, rails, and signals on a more direct Connecticut River Valley route. Back on track is train service to Holyoke and Northampton. Greenfield is a big winner, gaining its first ever station stop. But Amherst is the bigger loser. Its station will shut down, since the stop had only been set up as a way around the crumbling original route. Vermont also gets $50 million to beef up its bridges and tracks. (A complete list of high speed rail grant winners is here. )

Continue Reading
0
2
0
2
1
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0